Warning Added to Library Borrowed Kindle Ebooks

Screen shot of dialog warning borrowers that Amazon has access to your check out record.
Kindle Warning
As previously noted, you can borrows ebooks from the library for the Kindle reader or Kindle apps. You can even cleverly extend the due date on a borrowed Kindle ebook. So it’s about time that Amazon and Overdrive warned borrowers that Amazon has access to your library record. They’ve added a warning dialog. I say they because while I think it’s Overdrive, it could be the local library; I honestly can’t tell, and both parties have declined to respond to inquiries.

It’s not clear, really, in terms of what they have access to; mostly it just states you’re leaving the library’s site and going to an unnamed third-party site that does not share the library’s privacy policy.

I wish they’d tell people up front that Amazon gets your email, the title and associated metatdata of the book you are borrowing, and the due date, and that Amazon will email you to tell you that the book is due in X days (usually 2) and offer to sell you a copy. I also wish that they required you to opt-in, or at least offer an opt-out.

iPad for Book Lovers

Peachpit has posted an article by me about my love for books, and the iPad:

Lisa L. Spangenberg, coauthor of The iPad 2 Project Book, readily confesses to being nuts about books. Like many of us, she is gradually becoming more comfortable with substituting digital reading for paperbacks and hardbacks, but she is already hopelessly in love with the many free (or very cheap) apps that let lovers of reading explore the written world in a whole new way.

There are so many super iPad apps for readers and bibliophile’s that I’ll be posting about some apps that I had to remove from the Peachpit article because it was already quite lengthy. In the meantime, head on over to Peachpit to read The Best iPad Apps for Book Lovers.

How to Extend The Due Date of your Kindle Library Book

Via Librarian by Day Bobbi Newman (who tweets as @librarianbyday):

It is pretty easy to “extend” the due date of the library ebook you check out to your kindle, just turn your wireless connection off until you’re done with it. This will allow you to keep reading the book until you’re done. The title won’t expire until you reactivate your wireless connection.

Ms Newman notes that the “buy this book” note from Amazon that arrives three days before the book is due is a useful reminder to shut off your connection until you’ve read the book.

This is more practical for readers using the Kindle reader, or using the Kindle app on an iPad or iPhone to read a library book, of course, but still awfully useful.

We Seem to Be Doing OK

Screen shot from iTunes taken at 2:23 pm today; three of the books my colleagues Michael E. Cohen and Dennis Cohen wrote are in the iBooks Top Computers and Internet Paid Books.

Thanks people who bought our books; thanks Peachpit for being a great publisher. I’ll be sending out review copies this week; thanks to Peachpit for those, too.