NIXPlay 10 inch Digital Frame

I bought this NIXPlay Advance 10-Inch Widescreen digital frame for my mom after reading this WireCutter review of the Nix Seed. My mom doesn’t have WiFi, so the NIX Seed wasn’t an option for her. She loves her Nix Advance. It holds a giant amount of images and videos, and so the image is always fresh. And the clock function is useful too.

It has a beautiful wide-screen display, it came with an 8 GB UBS thumb drive but it can also take SD/SDHC cards. It displays JPEGs and MPEG-4 videos, including sound. It also has a calendar and clock, and you can set the time to display on the lower right-hand corner.  The motion sensor can be set for a duration, and it means the frame display “sleeps” when there’s no one around to appreciate it. You can have the images and/or videos play back in sequence or randomly, with a variety of dissolves.

The remote is easy to use, as are the button options on the back of the frame. There are a variety of sizes and features available, including NIXPlay frames with WiFi support. It took me all of 10 minutes to set up the frame, after coping files to the USB thumb drive that was included with the frame.

This NIXPlay digital frame is a great gift for someone. Pick out the videos and images you want to display on the frame, then when it arrives, copy them to the included USB drive or (the cloud for WiFi versions) and they’ve got a gift rich with memories and joy. Plus, it’s easy to pop the drive off the back of the frame and freshen it with new images. There are a number of options in terms of NixPlay digital frame sizes and WiFi support, including both smaller and larger frames.

NIXPlay Advance 10-Inch Widescreen digital frame Features

  • Photo & 720p HD Video Playback: Mix photos (JPEG) and video (MPEG-4) in the same Slideshow.
  • 1280x 800 High Resolution IPS (16:10) LED Backlit Display
  • Hu-Motion Sensor: Turns the frame on when you enter the room and off when you leave the room, with several durations.
  • 8GB Thumb Portable Thumb Drive Memory Included, frame accepts USB & SD/SDHC Card.
  • Small well-designed remote control, with batteries pre-installed.
  • Clock/Calendar Function, Stereo Speakers, Full One Year Warranty.

Purchase From:
Amazon.com | Amazon Canada | Amazon UK | NIXPlay

Photobucket’s Stories Akin to iPhoto for iOS Journals

Photobucket has introduced Photobucket Stories as a brand-new Photobucket feature; in fact, it looks like Stories are still in Beta, and part of a general overhaul of Photobucket.

screen shot of an iPhoto for iOS Journal pageThe basic idea behind Stories is that you upload pictures, you select a background, you arrange them and title them, you select their size (small, medium, large), and you add text annotations in the form of small text fields with a choice of color and font (limited in both cases, but quite reasonable options).

You can drag and drop to rearrange; you can change photo size, text placement, etc. And it’s dead easy to Share your saved/published story, or invite collaborators.

Photobucket Stories are strikingly similar to iPhoto for iOS Journals. You can see what I thought about Journals for iPhoto for iOS.

You can’t add weather and calendar widgets, and stories are a bit more limited in terms of options for layouts, but the concept is the same, and frankly, it’s a bit easier to us (at least on the Web; thus far it doesn’t seem to be actively supported by the PhotoBucket iOS app). Like Journals, Stories have built in facilities for sharing a link to a Story, but at least at present there’s no way to download all the content and make a stand-alone static Web site, the way you can with iPhoto for iOS Journals.

What’s interesting in particular about Stories is that you can collaborate with others on a Story. That’s a neat way to create a record of a family or group event, or to share data.

I made, roughly, the same kind of a Story as one of the previous Journals I made with iPhoto for iOS.

Here’s the Photobucket Story about Life in Washington.

Here’s the iPhoto for iOS Journal about A Year in Washington.  

I’m curious to see which of the new features are implements and supported in iOS apps.

Saved Photos

I need to create an avatar, based on a photo of me, to use in Facebook. I don’t want to use a normal image; I want to digitally manipulate it slightly. I can do the manipulation in the free iApp PhotoPad, but I needed to get the image to PhotoPad, which means getting it in the Photos app on my iPad.

Since I’m too lazy to connect my iPad to my Mac, I uploaded the image to my Photobucket account, and using the free Photobucket app, moved it to Saved Photos, which appeared, magically as an Album in my iPad’s Photos app.